Theory Test Questions About Road Signs

Theory Test Questions About Road Signs

Every year, hundreds of thousands of copies of The Highway Code are sold, ensuring that it remains on the best-seller lists for an extended period of time. It is one of the few books still in existence that can lay claim to having saved tens of thousands of lives over the years. 

The first edition, which was published in 1931, contained the following information: Since the Code’s inception, it has been subjected to periodic amendments to keep pace with technological advancements as well as innovations in traffic management and road safety. The first time traffic signs were depicted in a diagram was in the second edition, which contained only ten signs in all. Now there are many, many more. 

These days, UK learner drivers have to pass a theory test before they can take their practical driving test. The driving theory test is multiple-choice, with one of the 20 questions in its Hazard Perception section being about road signs. You can’t miss them. They are the most important things to pay attention to while driving on the road. But what happens when you come across a sign you do not know? Here is a brief overview of road signs and how you can work out what they mean.

There are hundreds of different road signs, each with its unique meaning, on this stretch of road. However, based on their shape, the majority of them fall into one of three categories. The general guideline is as follows: 

  • Circular road signs: Circular road signs convey orders, and they must be followed in order to remain within the boundaries of the law. Circles with a red border indicate what you are not allowed to do such as take a U-turn.  Blue circles are typically used to convey something that you can do, such as ‘turn left ahead of you.
  • Triangle road signs: Triangular road signs are warnings. In the shape of an equilateral triangle, road signs are intended to alert you to changes in the road layout or any potential hazards that may be ahead, such as sharp turns. They are usually always surrounded by a red border.
  • Rectangle road signs: Road signs in the shape of rectangles communicate. Motorways are marked with blue rectangular signs, principal roads are marked with green rectangular signs, and minor roads are marked with white rectangular signs, all of which are numbered. The use of rectangular signs can also be used to designate bus lanes and congestion fee zones. 

The majority of traffic signs, such as speed restrictions, should be self-explanatory; nevertheless, there are a few that are not quite so obvious. These might include the ever-confusing ‘National Speed Limit Applies sign’. Where you are driving changes the national speed limit. So, how fast should you be going and where?

  • In built-up areas, where there are street lamps placed no more than 200 yards apart, the speed limit is 30mph for all vehicles.
  • On a single carriageway, cars and vans should do a maximum of 60mph, but 50mph if towing
  • On a dual carriageway or a motorway, cars and vans should be doing 70mph, and towing vehicles should be doing 60mph.

Of course, even when the national speed limit applies, it might not always be safe or practical to drive at that speed, so use your common sense on this. It is a limit, not a target. 

 

 

 

How do I pull up on the right?

How do I pull up on the right?

How do I pull up on the right?

During your driving test, the examiner will ask you to complete a number of different manoeuvres. One of the things that you will be asked to do will be to pull up on the right.

Your examiner will use an exact phrase when asking you to do this. Their instruction will be “I would like you to pull up on the right at a safe, legal place, reverse back two car lengths then drive away safely, doing it with due regard and safety for other road users.”  

The first thing that you will need to do once you have been given this instruction is to look for somewhere that is both safe and legal to do this. You won’t be told where to do the maneuver, instead, you will need to make an assessment. You should do this using a technique called LADA – Look, Assess, Decide, and then Act. 

Applying LADA To Pulling Up On The Right 

You will first need to find a place to pull up at the right-hand side. Make sure you check all of the road markings as well as any features that may prohibit you from stopping there. For example, you shouldn’t stop on a bend, or on zig-zag lines. You should also avoid bus stops and driveways. Try to find a space that is large enough that you will be able to get in easily without having to swerve. 

Once you have found somewhere that is suitable for you to stop, you will need to assess whether it safe for you to stop there. 

One of the most obvious things that you need to be looking out for is oncoming traffic. While there may be some traffic coming towards you, it is unlikely that you will be asked to complete this task on a busy road. After all, your examiner is not trying to fail you. It wouldn’t be fair or safe to make you perform the maneuver on a busy street. 

Applying MSPSL On Pulling Up On The Right 

 

MSPSL stands for mirrors, signal, position, speed, and look. 

Mirrors refer to checking both your interior and your door mirrors. Check what is behind you. Are they quite close behind you? Are they about to overtake? Is the driver paying full attention? 

If there is anything happening behind you that will prevent you from safely slowing, stoping and pulling over, then you should think about pulling over at a later time when it is safe to do so. 

If necessary, you should use your indicator to show that you want to intend on moving. Make sure that you use it in good time so that you can alert other drivers to your intentions. If there are no other cars on the road, then you don’t need to indicate. 

Make sure that you gradually adjust the position of your vehicle, particularly if there are vehicles following you. 

Depending on what is behind you and what is in front of you will determine the speed at which you slow down. Progressive braking is better. 

Look up the length of the road and all around you are ensure that nothing has changed around you. 

Reversing Back Two Car Lengths 

You will be required to reverse back two car lengths after you have pulled over. It is essential that you ensure it’s safe to do this before making the move. Check all around you before you start. 

While reversing, stay close to the kerb but avoid hitting or mounting it, or you’ll receive a fault. 

Even if the road is quiet, make sure you are checking all around you. This will show the examiner that you know where and how to look. 

If a car pulls up behind you while you are carrying out the manoeuvre, then you’ll not be able to reverse the full two lengths. Instead, you should reverse back as far as you possibly can while leaving a gap between yourself and the car behind.  

Moving Off Safely 

Before you move off, make sure you look in both directions up and down the road. Remember that you shouldn’t make other vehicles slow down or change direction. When joining the left-hand side of the road you’ll need to move at the speed of the traffic. This may mean using a lower gear longer to maintain the momentum needed. 

Finally, once you have rejoined the road you should check your mirrors to check how the other vehicles behind you have reacted to you joining the road. 

 

What are some good tips before taking my driving test?

What are some good tips before taking my driving test?

The driving test is what you’ve been working towards. Regardless of how many driving lessons you’ve had or how many theory test attempts, you’re at the final stretch. Your driving test is the opportunity to show what you’ve learned, and you’ll be assessed on a series of tasks set by the examiner.

You won’t know what these are until you do the test, which can be nerve-racking.

Here are some useful tips for you that you might find useful when it comes to preparing for your driving test.

Learn To Drive In A Variety Of Conditions

Whenever you have a driving lesson, neither you nor your instructor can control the weather. If you’ve had mainly dry days where your lesson has landed, then it’s worth driving on a wet day.

Try and book in a last-minute slot were possible on a day where it’s raining. The more weather conditions you drive in, the better prepared you’ll be on the test. So whether your driving test is in the rain or on a dry day, you won’t feel put off by it.

Have A Lesson Beforehand

In order to relieve any nerves, it’s good to have a driving lesson before the test. Ideally, you want this to be on the same day, if possible. That way, you have a chance to relax into the driving and go over anything you’re unsure of. Some can take their driving instructors along with them, but that’s up to you.

Make sure you go over all the relevant maneuvers that are common in tests. Your driving instructor should know these and will give you any last-minute tips too.

Arrive Early

Arriving early is better than arriving late. And when it comes to your test, you don’t want anything getting in the way. Even arriving on time can mean you don’t have a moment to prepare yourself. Getting there early enough can give you time to relax, think everything through, and be ready.

It can be surprising what a bit of alone time to reflect can do for you in preparation for the exam.

Ask Your Examiner To Repeat When Needed

The atmosphere of a test can feel very nerve-racking. It’s important that you don’t let that be something that gets to you. As you go through your test, if there’s anything you misheard, ask it to be repeated.

Don’t just carry on as normal or attempting to do something that you thought was needed. Always clarify anything that your examiner says and repeat the task out load so that it sinks in.

Don’t feel awkward or embarrassed, it could be the difference between you passing and failing.

Remember To Breathe

As mentioned already, take your time and remember to breathe. It can be stressful enough, and when you’re stressed, you don’t breathe properly. We get shortness of breathe when, in fact, we want deep breathing. This can help make things clearer and less chaotic.

There are lots of different breathing techniques to try out. It’s worth doing them in your driving lessons early on or at any time where you feel nervous. There’s likely to be something that can help you.

The examiner will be sure to tell you to relax because they want you to do your best. Take their advice, take a deep breath, and trust yourself to succeed.

Never Assume You’ve Failed

There are occasions where a learner driver has thought they’ve failed when they haven’t. In fact, it could be that they failed on something that wasn’t recognised by yourself.

Never assume that you’ve failed, even if you know you did something wrong.

The distinction between majors and minors can be so discreet that you should always stay positive.

Continue to do as you are told, and don’t keep your eye off the ball until you’ve finished. As much as it can feel like you’ve failed, that might not be the case.

Be Sure To Listen For Tips If You Failed

At the end of the test, it can be hard to stay attentive when you’re told that you’ve failed. However, the feedback that an examiner gives can be crucial for your next test.

Take in all the information, and be sure to relay this to the instructor if they’re not there. If they are, they’ll likely to use the information to help you pass next time around.

Driving tests are certainly a nerve-racking experience, but it’s important to keep a level head.

Get plenty of rest the night before, arrive early, and be sure to breathe properly during the test.

Take your time and be attentive throughout!

Can I use an interpreter for my driving test?

Why Can’t You Have An Interpreter

Prior to 2014, anyone who didn’t speak English as their first language was allowed to have an interpreter for their driving test. This interpreter could be someone who was their driving instructor or a family member or friend who spoke the language fluently. You could also pick from a range of languages during your theory test too.

However, these laws changed, and you are no longer allowed an interpreter during your test.

Why Can’t You Have An Interpreter?

The laws changed for a number of reasons. Firstly, the new laws in place help those learn the national language. It can be helpful to communicate fluently in English, not just for the test but beyond.

You might need to communicate with other drivers whilst on the road. There’s also the relevant signs on the road that you’ll need to be able to read.

Taking your practical and theory test in the UK requires you to take the language in English, and that’s your only option. If anything, it’s helpful for non-English speakers to help better their language skills.

One of the main concerns, when it came to interpreters, was that the examiner had no idea whether someone was cheating or not. T

here were restrictions on how often the interpreter could speak, but even then, the examiner wouldn’t know if, during those conversations, they were aiding the learner driver.

Removing the interpreter was an assurance that there would be no cheating at all.

Road safety is obviously very important and when it comes to learning signs, it’s important to be able to read them when they’re in English or Welsh. Driving in the UK for a non-English speaker would be difficult if they didn’t have much knowledge of the English language.

It could put them at risk and risk other driver’s safety too. It makes sure that every student who passes knows exactly how to read road signage properly.

Fewer costs are an advantage when it comes to removing the voiceover element of the theory test. It costs a considerable amount of money to translate exams tests and so saving money is clearly a pro for getting rid of the multiple-choice languages.

Can I Take A Foreign Language Driving Test?

Knowledge and understanding of the English language are essential for taking the theory and driving test. However, it is possible to organise driving instructors in your native language if necessary. It can be easier for you to relax into driving if you have someone who speaks your language and can explain all the manoeuvres properly. Depending on where you go for your driving test, there can be a difficulty when finding a native speaker.

It’s worth enquiring about this before booking in your test, and to explore the areas where you would prefer to take the test too. You should also take note that it shouldn’t cost you any more money to take the test with a foreign language instructor.

What Are The Alternatives To An Interpreter?

Although there’s no getting around having an interpreter during your test, you can still have a friend or family member with you in place of the instructor. This can be really helpful if you’re someone who gets quite nervous and needs that element of reassurance. Having a family member or friend can give you that familiar face when you’re stepping into the car with an examiner. Every examiner will want to put your mind at ease, but even though that’s the case, it’s still nice to have someone you know that’s there silently cheering you along.

It’s also good to have your instructor there if you want them to as an alternative. It’s up to you whether it’s going to mean more pressure or if it puts you at ease. It’s worth talking to your instructor about it to figure out if it’s something that you want to do. You could also make a preference of whether you want a man or woman examiner for your driving test if needs be. If you’re not fussed, then there’s no issue, but if you’d feel more comfortable with a man than a woman or vice versa, then this can be arranged.

Be confident in your driving test, and be sure to take a breather. It’s going to be nerve-racking, but if you take your time and believe in yourself, you’re more than likely to pass the first time. If not, then don’t get yourself down in the dumps. It’ll happen eventually, and everyone is different and acts differently under pressure.

10 Awkward Driving Lesson Moments

Awkward Driving Lesson Moments

When you are learning to drive, you are bound to make some mistakes. Everybody does it, and most of the time, it’s fine. But every driving instructor has plenty of stories about serious blunders that some of their students have made.

The dynamic between a driving instructor and a student can be a little strange at first as well because you are in such a confined environment with somebody that you barely know. That means that there is a lot of potential for awkward moments during driving lessons.

These are the 10 most awkward driving lesson moments you will have to deal with.

Small Talk 

It’s always awkward trying to hold a conversation with somebody that you don’t really know that well, but you usually have a quick escape route if you bump into them in the street. But when you are having a driving lesson, you are stuck in the car together with no way out.

After a few lessons, things will get easier once you get to know them a bit but it’s going to be awkward to begin with. Driving instructors are used to this so it’s likely that they’ll have a stock of questions that they ask to move things along a bit. 

Getting The Wrong Name 

This one can happen on either side, but it’s less likely that you’ll forget the driving instructors name because it’s usually written on the side of the car. The instructor, on the other hand, gives a lot of driving lessons each day and it’s likely that some of their students have similar names, which means they might get yours wrong. It’s always a little awkward to correct somebody for the first time, but it’ll be way more awkward if you let it slide and they continue calling you the wrong name for months before eventually seeing your real name on some paperwork. 

Picking Your Nose 

Most of us don’t like to admit it, but when nobody is around, we sometimes like to have a little scratch around in our nose. We’re not like little kids with a finger buried up there, but we’d still rather that nobody else saw us. The problem is, when you are concentrating on the road, you might forget that somebody else is sitting right next to you and decide to have a dig around. 

Forgetting Your Lesson 

Picture the scene, you’re all tucked up in bed enjoying a relaxing Saturday morning and suddenly, the doorbell goes. So, you get up and drag yourself to the door in your pajamas, only to find your driving instructor on the other side. You’re embarrassed because they’ve seen you in your pajamas and they’re frustrated that you’re late. Next time, just set a reminder on your phone. 

Not Knowing Left And Right 

When you’re driving and your instructor starts giving you directions, it’s always a bit awkward if you don’t know left and right. The first few times, they might put it down to nerves, but eventually, you’ll just have to admit it and ask for help. 

Driving Past Your Ex 

Bumping into an ex is always awkward, but it’s so much worse if you drive past them on a driving lesson. They’re watching you, hoping that you’ll stall the car so they can laugh at you. Your driving instructor will probably notice that something is up, which makes it all the more awkward when they ask if you know each other. The best thing to do is just focus on the road and try to ignore them. 

Driving Past Your Friends

Driving past your ex is bad, but driving past your friends can be even worse. They’ll all be trying to distract you and you want to make sure that you look cool in front of them, which is never going to happen. Again, the best thing to do is try to ignore them.  

Repeatedly Stalling

Everybody stalls from time to time, that’s normal. But things get awkward when you’re sitting at a junction with a long line of traffic building up behind you and you keep stalling over and over. Eventually, your driving instructor will have to take over so they can get the flow of traffic moving and you’ll be left feeling embarrassed. 

Needing The Toilet

Rule number one, always go to the toilet before your lesson. It’s always an awkward situation when you have to ask your driving instructor if you can stop the lesson and find somewhere to go to the toilet halfway through. It’s even more awkward if they’re the one that needs to go. 

Failing Your Test 

It always feels awkward when you have to tell your instructor that you have failed your test and you need more driving lessons. But you’ve got to remember that driving instructors have a lot of students, and a lot of them fail, so there’s no need to worry about it really. 

You’re going to experience some of these awkward moments at some point during your driving lessons, so prepare yourself. 

 

What to expect on your first driving lesson

What to expect on your first driving lesson

Your first driving lesson is a big milestone and you’re probably pretty excited about it, but it’s also very nerve wracking. Taking control of a car is a big deal, and it’s a lot of responsibility to take on. In the lead up to your first lesson, you will invent so many hypothetical scenarios in your own head, most of them bad. What happens if I crash the car? What if I accidentally run somebody over? What if I can’t even get it started in the first place? It’s so easy to think of the worst case scenario and get worried about your first driving lesson, but the reason that you have driving instructors is so you are safe and you don’t make any of these dangerous mistakes. 

If you are concerned about your first driving lesson, it helps if you know what to expect and how to prepare yourself properly. That way, you are not in for any surprises and you will be less worried about what might happen. Here’s what you can expect from your first driving lesson. 

Preparing Yourself 

Before you start the first lesson, there are a few important things you should do to prepare. First off, make sure that you get a good night’s sleep the night before. You need to be alert when driving, so being tired will make things difficult for you. Secondly, make sure that you are not drinking the night before your first lesson. Even if it is just a few drinks, this can still affect your cognitive ability and your reaction times in the morning. Finally, eat a good breakfast before you have your lesson because you will find it harder to concentrate if you are hungry. 

There are also a few things that you should bring with you on your driving lessons. You will need your provisional driving license, some comfy shoes that have good grip, and glasses if you wear them. Don’t forget to bring cash or a cheque to pay for your lesson as well. Driving instructors won’t work for free, but if you do happen to forget, they’ll probably let you off until next time. 

Getting Picked Up

You need to arrange the pick up with the driving instructor before the lesson because some instructors will wait in the car while others will come to the door. When they do pick you up, you won’t have to get in the driver’s seat right away, so you can just relax. You’ll get in the passenger side and they will drive you to a safe location. 

The Cockpit Drill

Most driving instructors will take you to a specific place that they know is quiet, before switching seats with you so you are in the driver’s seat. Before they let you loose on the controls, they will take you through the cockpit drill. This is the set of checks that you need to do every time you get into the car. 

You can remember these checks using the acronym, DSSSM: 

  • Doors – Are the doors securely closed? 
  • Seat – Is the seat in a comfortable position? 
  • Steering – Is the steering position correct? 
  • Seatbelts – Does everybody in the car have their seatbelt on?
  • Mirrors – Are all of the mirrors adjusted correctly? 

It’s a good idea to try to memorize this before you have your first driving lesson so you already know what you’re doing, but all driving instructors will take you through it step by step anyway. 

Learning The Basics 

Once all of your checks are completed, your driving instructor will start taking you through the basics. They will run through the clutch, accelerator, and brakes, and show you how to use the handbrake and change gears. If there is anything that you are unsure about here, it’s perfectly fine to ask if they can run through it again. It’s important that you know what you are doing before you set off because, even if you are only going 20mph, it’s still going to be scary if you don’t feel in control of the vehicle. It’s a good idea to make your first driving lesson 2 hours long, so you have enough time to get to know the controls and get some driving in. 

Hitting The Road 

Now that you know how all of the basic controls in the car work, it’s time to put it into practice and hit the road. This is the most exciting, but also the most nerve wracking part of the lesson. But don’t worry, your instructor will be there every step of the way. 

In your first driving lesson, you will learn a few key procedures that your driving instructor will explain before you set off. These will include: 

  • Starting the engine. 
  • Clutch control. More specifically, finding the biting point. 
  • Checking your mirrors and your blind spot. 
  • Using indicators to signal. 
  • Changing gear. 
  • Bringing the car to a safe stop. 
  • Curb side parking. 

These are the basics of operating a car and, hopefully, you should feel confident enough to move onto the road and try some real driving by the end of your first lesson. Keep in mind that your driving instructor will have their own set of controls for the car, so you don’t need to worry if you feel overwhelmed and they need to take over. 

After Your First Driving Lesson 

When the lesson is over, your driving instructor will drop you back at home. At this point, they will have a discussion with you about how the lesson went, and tell you some of the things that you can improve on next time. Make sure that you listen carefully and take note of everything because you may be able to study up on some of these things at home between lessons. 

Before you leave, it’s time to book your next lesson. Ideally, you should minimize time between lessons and try to have 2 or 3 a week if your schedule allows it. 

 

Congratulations, you’ve successfully made it through your very first driving lesson and you are well on the way to passing your test. 

How Two Seconds Could Save Your Life

How Two Seconds Could Save Your Life

Analysis of more than 100,000 miles of driving of British drivers has shown that there is a cause for concern for safety on the road. During the 8,500 hours of driving, many drivers were found not to be keeping safe distances from the vehicles in front.

Or worse, the drivers were cutting up other drivers, dangerously close.

The report highlights that many British drivers are putting their lives on the line with these dangerous driving practices. Other reports have shown that more than 6000 accidents a year are because drivers haven’t kept to sensible ‘breaking distances’. This figure doesn’t include accidents where other factors (like distracted drivers, icy road conditions or excessive speed) could also be blamed for an accident.

A result of an accident can be life-changing, and some 30 drivers lose their lives on British roads every year. So, how much space should you be leaving between you and the car in front?

What the Highway Code states

Rule 126 of the Highway Code states that you need to leave enough distance between you and the vehicle to your front so that there is enough time to pull up safely if the vehicle in front suddenly stops or slows down.

This safe rule states that you should never be closer than the total stopping distance, which is the total distance it takes for you to react and the car to stop.

The Highway Code does state that a two-second gap should be adhered to between you and the vehicle to your front when you’re on roads with fast-moving traffic or in a tunnel.

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If there is water on the roads, this should be doubled (at least). In icy conditions, you should increase this distance even more.

The report found that when driving in icy conditions, the gap between cars should be about 20 seconds. Yet many British drivers don’t follow that basic rule.

Are drivers sticking to these rules?

Despite the obvious dangers of an accident, British drivers aren’t complying with the Highway Code. One in five drivers will cut between cars when there is insufficient space to allow for a one-second gap between them and either the car in front or behind them. This is really dangerous as this is shorter than the reaction time of a human.

The average gap being left by many drivers is in fact just 1.35 seconds and this has been recorded at any speeds higher than 25 miles per hour.

Sticking to the two-second rule

Sticking to the two-second rule is something challenging for drivers. Mostly because there are few ways to determine what distance that is on any given road. However, there is a simple way to measure the distance between you and another vehicle. You simply pick a stationary point on the side of the road, or on the road, and count the time it takes between the two vehicles to reach that point.

This simple method of determining the distance between vehicles could be a life-saver

You should also be on the lookout for drivers around you who aren’t paying attention to their distances. On motorways and dual carriageways, use your mirrors to see if there are drivers who are too close or are regularly cutting other drivers up. Be more prepared to break around these drivers to protect yourself.

Finally, remember your driving lessons. If you had cut someone up or changed lanes in your driving test, then you would not have passed.

That rule is there for a reason, it is to get you into a good habit of keeping you and other drivers around you safe. Don’t be tempted to pick up the bad habits of other drivers and put yourself in unnecessary danger by being careless with your distances.

5 Steps To Make Sure You Pass Your Driving Test

If you are nervous the night before your driving test, then you’re probably not yet ready to get your driver’s licence. The number one obstacle to passing the test is the lack of adequate preparation.

To gain the confidence required, it’s mandatory to undertake several hours of intensive lessons behind the wheel and study relevant books.

So, what is the secret to passing the test? Here are the steps to follow.

1. Anticipate What Might Happen Next And Be Prepared

The task of driving a car is unpredictable since you never know what is waiting for you around the next corner, which is why driving tests are also unpredictable.

But there are several things that you should anticipate, for example, pedestrians wanting to cross the road, so be on the lookout for traffic lights and zebra crossings.

Be aware and observant because someone’s life might depend on your driving skills. Always think about your next move in case another car comes out of nowhere and you need to brake suddenly.

2. If You Make A Mistake, Don’t Assume You’ve Already Failed The Test

It’s normal to make mistakes during the test, for example, stalling the car when pulling over. Don’t start to over-think or worry.

If you continue the test while thinking about the mistake you made, chances are that you will make even more serious mistakes.

The examiner sees the situation differently, particularly if you stalled the car but restarted it without causing any danger to other road users.

If you make a mistake, forget about it and concentrate on driving the vehicle safely for the remainder of the test period.

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3. Focus On The Road, Not On What The Examiner Is Writing

During the test, the examiner will have a test sheet that they will be writing on occasionally.

Don’t be tempted to peek on the sheet as this could easily distract you from the main task at hand which is driving. The examiner does not always write negative things, so stay positive and focussed.

When there is not much going on, the examiner might start a conversation with you to help you relax. Be courteous but don’t shift your focus from the test.

Although it can be hard to concentrate when the weather is bad or there are other ongoing distractions, make sure your mind does not wander off.

4. Don’t Assume The Road Rules

For example, don’t assume that you’re still on a road with a speed limit of 40kmph without checking for speed limit signs.

Also, keep in mind that you should maintain the left-hand lane if you want to go straight in a roundabout. Check all markings and road signs when driving because if you fail to do so and something unfortunate happens, you’ll fail the driving test.

5. Have a good night’s rest the day before the test

The importance of having adequate rest cannot be overemphasised since it’s a well-known fact that the right amount of sleep will enable you to function at your best. If you stay up till late, you’ll wake up feeling tired and this will consequently affect your concentration levels thus putting you at a disadvantage.

According to a recent report, if you don’t sleep for the recommended eight hours, you double the risk of getting involved in an accident the following day.

If you make a series of dangerous or serious mistakes, you’re probably not ready for the test. Consider getting more practice and delaying the test. However, you can go ahead and book the test if you feel you’re ready. These tips will help you to pass and acquire a driver’s licence.

Top 10 Most Difficult Theory Test Questions

Most Difficult Theory Test Questions

When learning to drive, everyone now has to get past the theory test as well as the practical one. Many people find the theory test daunting and something that they do not look forward too.

Your driving theory test should not really pose any problems though with the right preparation in place. One thing to watch out for is those annoyingly tough questions that seem designed to trip you up.

To help out, the below shows 10 of the most mind-bending theory test questions to look out for.

1. When should you not overtake?

– After navigating a bend
– On a road with a 30mph speed limit
– When driving down a 1-way street
– When the road you are driving down has a dip in it

This question is tricky because all of the answers may well be valid reasons not to overtake! For the purposes of your theory test though, it is the last answer which is right.

2. When travelling on a dry road at 50 mph in decent weather, what is the standard average stopping distance?

– 36 metres
– 75 metres
– 96 metres
– 53 metres

If you are not confident with math, then this could be a tough one for you. You need to remember that stopping distance is equal to thinking distance combined with braking distance.

At 50mph, your thinking distance is 15 metres while 38 metres is the braking distance which makes 53 metres the correct answer.

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3. What colour comes after Green on Puffin crossings?

– intermittent amber
– constant red
– constant amber
– intermittent green

Puffin crossings use sensors which can tell when people are crossing. This means there is no need for intermittent or flashing lights – the right answer is a constant amber.

4. When towing a compact-sized trailer on a packed 3 lane motorway, you notice all lanes being open. Should you:

– not go over 50mph
– decide not to overtake anyone
– fit a stabiliser
– stick to the centre and left lanes

While you may think all sound plausible, it is actually the last answer that is the one to pick.

5. In terms of road transport, what percentage of emissions does it account for?

– 20%
– 10%
– 40%
– 30%

This fools people as it is more of a general knowledge question than a pure driving one. While 10% would seem too little with so much traffic about but 40% may be too much, it is sensible to go more down the middle. 20% is the correct reply in this case.

6. If involved in a road incident, it is vital to care for any injured parties. After the scene of the incident is secure, you should:

– Help them from their vehicle
– Offer them something to drink
– Offer them some food
– Make them stay in their vehicle

This comes across as quite an easy one but it is key to not jump in without thinking it through. The last answer is correct as the area is safe in this particular instance.

7. When driving, you observe a pedestrian walking a dog. The dog has a burgundy or yellow coat. This tells you that the person is:

a) A senior citizen

b) Training the dog

c) Is colour blind

d) Deaf

This is quite an obscure one which is why it catches so many out! The correct answer is deaf – make sure to brush up on this kind of question before your theory test.

8. While waiting to turn left, you see a larger vehicle approaching from your right. You could go ahead and turn, but instead, wait. Why is this?

– The larger vehicle could be hiding others from the left
– It could be hiding a vehicle that is overtaking it
– It may decide to turn abruptly
– The larger vehicle may have trouble steering straight

The larger vehicle could easily be hiding another vehicle which is overtaking it so the second option is the answer you want.

9. When is it acceptable to overtake another road user on their left?

– Driving along one-way streets
– Coming up to a motorway slip road at which you plan to exit
– After a vehicle you are behind has signalled to make a left turn
– If a slow vehicle is in the lane on the right when traversing a dual carriageway

Although the presence of ‘right’ and ‘left in different answers may confuse you, do not let it. The right response here is the first.

10. Questions about road signs

While there is no specific example here, it is just a good idea to brush up on all your road signs. Any could crop up on your theory test and you could be asked what they mean. While the more common ones may be obvious, it is the less widely known examples that could trip you up.

Get ready to pass with flying colours

The above are certainly the 10 hardest sorts of question which you could face on your theory test. When you really think about them though and do your homework, they actually aren’t that scary. One thing is for sure – if you get these right, then the other questions will be no problem.

Test Pass Rate Success For Drivers In Essex

Getting behind the wheel for the first time can be a challenging and nerve-inducing task and having the freedom to drive yourself around is something that definitely shouldn’t be taken for granted.

Understanding the rules of the roads and manoeuvring your way through your lessons to your driving test will come quicker than you know it and it will soon be time to don your test-taking hat and get those learner plates well and truly removed.

How do I know when I’m ready to take my test?

A good driving school will only advise you to take your practical driving test when they’re absolutely sure that you’re ready to do so.

Driving tests themselves can be costly – you have to pay both for the time of the examiner and for the lease of the vehicle you’ll be driving in – so taking a test when you have no chance of passing is only going to be detrimental to your confidence.

If you don’t feel ready for your test then keep practising and taking lessons until you’re confident enough to give it a go.

There’s no ‘right time’ to take your driving test, nor should you take a certain number of lessons before you book your test – everyone is different and everyone learns at a different pace.

At the same time, if you feel confident but your instructor advises you not to take your test just yet – listen to them. They have your best interests at heart and want to ensure that you pass your driving test at the first time of taking it.

Once both parties are confident then you’re much more likely to be in a position where you pass at the first time of asking.

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What should I expect on the day of my test?

Driving tests are rigid in their approach and focus on the same tasks. When you arrive at the test centre, you’ll need your provisional licence with you – if you don’t have it with you, you can’t take the test.

Once the test begins (that is, you have left the waiting room with the examiner) you will be asked to read a number plate from 20 metres away to test your eyesight. You will then be asked questions about vehicle safety and maintenance, and asked to drive for 20 minutes independently.

Whilst driving, you will also be asked to perform one manoeuvre – with parallel parking, bay parking or pulling up on the right being possible manoeuvre choices.

When you have arrived back at the test centre your examiner will talk you through any faults you made – minor or major faults- and inform you of their decision. They may also advise you to take a Pass Plus qualification to further strengthen your confidence on the road.

Whereabouts in Essex should I take my test?

Essex as a county has a wide range of testing centres which have excellent reputations for ensuring that their learner drivers get the best possible driving test experience. Pass rates, as intriguing as they may be, actually don’t mean an awful lot – just because another driver failed to pass their test on their first time of taking it – or vice versa- doesn’t mean that you will.

Whether you pass your test or not depends on your performance during the test itself so you should familiarise yourself with the area where your testing centre is before taking the test. If you’re looking for the best location in Essex to pass your test, then Clacton, at 50.8% pass rate, has the best reputation for first-time success.

Similarly, Hoffman’s Way in Chelmsford is a great bet – coming in at 42.9% (https://www.gazette-news.co.uk/news/17336247.here-are-the-best-places-in-essex-to-pass-your-driving-test/). Practising on roads in close vicinity to the testing centre – as well as practising on a wide range of roads – gives you the highest possible chance of success.

Choose a test centre close to you, where you feel the most confidence and forget about the numbers.