33 New Drivers Are Losing Their Licence Every Day

Young drivers have historically been given a bad name and new statistics suggests why this is.

On average, 33 people are losing their licence each day in the UK with nearly 70% of these being new drivers between the ages of 17 and 24.

It isn’t surprising that new drivers often have to pay a higher insurance premium, and younger drivers even more so.

Why are so many people losing their licence?

The statistics follow the introduction of the New Driver Act that was put into practice in 2018. Some may believe that the act is unfair on new drivers, but all new drivers have a responsibility to keep the roads as safe as possible.

Under the act, if a new driver obtains six points on their licence in a two year period (within two years of passing) their licence will be revoked.

However, this doesn’t mean that the new driver is banned forever, instead, the driver is banned temporarily and has to apply for their provisional licence again.

After they have obtained their provisional licence, they will then need to retake their theory test and practical driving test and pass these before being allowed back on the roads.

Are the new rules fair?

It is difficult to argue with the statistics that show young drivers are the most dangerous group when compared to others. For example, those aged between 17 and 24 make up just 7% of drivers on the road, yet the age group make up 20% of serious injuries or deaths on UK roads.

With numbers like this, it is easy to see why extra precautions need to be taken.

Whether the New Driver Act is the most successful method of giving extra protection to road users or not is debatable, and the act hasn’t yet been in place long enough for a true conclusion to be made.

Will I be penalised for being a new driver?

If you are looking to take your test in the near future then it is likely that you may have to adhere to additional rules initially.

Whether or not the New Driver Act will remain is unknown, especially as the UK is currently in a potential parliamentary transitional period.

With the future of the UK’s laws uncertain, a new act or regulations may be introduced for new drivers. There has been some talk of introducing a graduated licence scheme with an ongoing trial in Northern Ireland set to end in 2020.

This trial could lead the way for new rules and regulations in the UK for new drivers. The trail is based on similar schemes that have been put in place in other parts of the globe and have been fairly successful.

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What would a graduated licence scheme look like?

Although it is currently difficult to say what the exact structure of the scheme would be (as these vary globally), the road safety charity Brake has given us some idea of how this could look. Brake support the idea of the UK introducing a scheme like this.

Furthermore, they have called on the UK government to consider making it a legal requirement for all new drivers to spend 12 months learning to drive before they are allowed to take a test. This isn’t all that Brake wants to see if the scheme is introduced, they also want the government to consider introducing a curfew for new drivers.

This would mean that new drivers would only be allowed on the roads between certain times.

Finally, Brake believes that drivers should be given a two year probation period once they are given their licence, and only be able to graduate to a full unrestricted licence after two years of safe driving.

Top 10 Most Difficult Theory Test Questions

Most Difficult Theory Test Questions

When learning to drive, everyone now has to get past the theory test as well as the practical one. Many people find the theory test daunting and something that they do not look forward too.

Your driving theory test should not really pose any problems though with the right preparation in place. One thing to watch out for is those annoyingly tough questions that seem designed to trip you up.

To help out, the below shows 10 of the most mind-bending theory test questions to look out for.

1. When should you not overtake?

– After navigating a bend
– On a road with a 30mph speed limit
– When driving down a 1-way street
– When the road you are driving down has a dip in it

This question is tricky because all of the answers may well be valid reasons not to overtake! For the purposes of your theory test though, it is the last answer which is right.

2. When travelling on a dry road at 50 mph in decent weather, what is the standard average stopping distance?

– 36 metres
– 75 metres
– 96 metres
– 53 metres

If you are not confident with math, then this could be a tough one for you. You need to remember that stopping distance is equal to thinking distance combined with braking distance.

At 50mph, your thinking distance is 15 metres while 38 metres is the braking distance which makes 53 metres the correct answer.

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3. What colour comes after Green on Puffin crossings?

– intermittent amber
– constant red
– constant amber
– intermittent green

Puffin crossings use sensors which can tell when people are crossing. This means there is no need for intermittent or flashing lights – the right answer is a constant amber.

4. When towing a compact-sized trailer on a packed 3 lane motorway, you notice all lanes being open. Should you:

– not go over 50mph
– decide not to overtake anyone
– fit a stabiliser
– stick to the centre and left lanes

While you may think all sound plausible, it is actually the last answer that is the one to pick.

5. In terms of road transport, what percentage of emissions does it account for?

– 20%
– 10%
– 40%
– 30%

This fools people as it is more of a general knowledge question than a pure driving one. While 10% would seem too little with so much traffic about but 40% may be too much, it is sensible to go more down the middle. 20% is the correct reply in this case.

6. If involved in a road incident, it is vital to care for any injured parties. After the scene of the incident is secure, you should:

– Help them from their vehicle
– Offer them something to drink
– Offer them some food
– Make them stay in their vehicle

This comes across as quite an easy one but it is key to not jump in without thinking it through. The last answer is correct as the area is safe in this particular instance.

7. When driving, you observe a pedestrian walking a dog. The dog has a burgundy or yellow coat. This tells you that the person is:

a) A senior citizen

b) Training the dog

c) Is colour blind

d) Deaf

This is quite an obscure one which is why it catches so many out! The correct answer is deaf – make sure to brush up on this kind of question before your theory test.

8. While waiting to turn left, you see a larger vehicle approaching from your right. You could go ahead and turn, but instead, wait. Why is this?

– The larger vehicle could be hiding others from the left
– It could be hiding a vehicle that is overtaking it
– It may decide to turn abruptly
– The larger vehicle may have trouble steering straight

The larger vehicle could easily be hiding another vehicle which is overtaking it so the second option is the answer you want.

9. When is it acceptable to overtake another road user on their left?

– Driving along one-way streets
– Coming up to a motorway slip road at which you plan to exit
– After a vehicle you are behind has signalled to make a left turn
– If a slow vehicle is in the lane on the right when traversing a dual carriageway

Although the presence of ‘right’ and ‘left in different answers may confuse you, do not let it. The right response here is the first.

10. Questions about road signs

While there is no specific example here, it is just a good idea to brush up on all your road signs. Any could crop up on your theory test and you could be asked what they mean. While the more common ones may be obvious, it is the less widely known examples that could trip you up.

Get ready to pass with flying colours

The above are certainly the 10 hardest sorts of question which you could face on your theory test. When you really think about them though and do your homework, they actually aren’t that scary. One thing is for sure – if you get these right, then the other questions will be no problem.